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Jeffrey S. Brooks
3rd May 2011, 05:46 AM
Making vegetable oil blend Diesel Fuel (VOBDF) by blending Toluol with WVO
YouTube - Blending Toluol (Toluene) with Vegetable Oil to Make VO Blend Diesel Fuel (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-dbtChzNlc)

The point of this experiment and video is simply to demonstrating that Toluol will dissolve readily into WVO. It is purely of academic interest and is in no way an attempt to encourage its use or recommend its use over petroleum distillates. I am just posting these experimental blending videos to show that there is a range of solvents that could be blended with waste oils to make diesel fuel. It is up to the user to decide whether they wish to further the experiment by running it on an engine. If you do, then please post your findings on this thread.

The point is making diesel fuel out of waste oils is a form of recycling. And, there are many people making viable and sustainable diesel fuels by blending various solvents with various waste oils. Therefore, there is no reason why the solvents used to thin waste oil need not also be recycled, therefore it is conceivable that someone may come across some recycled Toluol and consider using it as a solvent for making diesel fuel by blending it with waste oils.

Tony From West Oz
3rd May 2011, 11:31 PM
Interesting.
Perhaps you could try comparing the viscosity of the oil before and after adding your solvents, to show the relative viscosity of rech blend, compared wirth the initial oil and the diesel viscosities.
A simple viscometer can be created using some clear tube, a valve to turn it on/off and a restrictive outlet.

make 2 widely spaced marks on the clear tube with the top one below the fill level.
Fill with the liquid under test and turn on the valve fully. Time the period between the oil level passing the top and bottom marks. Average 3 or 5 runs with each fluid.
Tabulate the results for each blend at the same temerature for each liquid.

This will assist others wishing to copmpare these potential fuels.

Regards,
Tony

tillyfromparadise
4th May 2011, 12:19 AM
Here in Australia, Toluene was used as an "extender" in petrol by some retailers because it was cheaper than petrol.
The government solved that problem by putting the same tax on it as it has on Petrol and diesel.
Now only the manufacturers can profitably adulturate their gasoline with toluene.

Jeffrey S. Brooks
4th May 2011, 01:33 AM
Thanks for the recommendations Tony. I will give it some thought. The object of the experiments was simply to find a class of solvents that will dissolve both in vegetable oil and petroleum distillates, but gathering other data, such as viscosity, specific gravity, cloud point, vapor pressure, water content, BTUs, MPG, dynomometer, etc. are all good suggestions. Perhaps when I begin to receive funding from the NSF to conduct my research I will be able to do those tests.

Thanks tillyfromparadise, for letting me know that at one time it was common practice in Australia to use Toluene as an "extender" in petrol.

Tony From West Oz
4th May 2011, 10:46 PM
Viscosity is all I asked for, SG doesn't matter, Cloud point depends on feedstock oil, vapour pressure is irrelevant, water content can be determined by methods already detailed here, BTUs, MPG, power are engine dependant, but viscosity before and after, compared with diesel (supplied in your location), that IS relevant to the blending of different solvents in the WVO.
You have the oil and the solvents and obviously the time to make these videos

There is no point in using a solvent unless the result is a blend which has a significantly reduced viscosity than the feedstock oil.

Do you disagree?

Regards,
Tony

Jeffrey S. Brooks
5th May 2011, 01:52 AM
There is no point in using a solvent unless the result is a blend which has a significantly reduced viscosity than the feedstock oil.

Do you disagree?

Regards,
TonyDon't you think that is a given? Although I would agree different solvents will thin at different rates dependent upon the solvent's viscosity.

Tony From West Oz
5th May 2011, 09:57 PM
Don't you think that is a given? Although I would agree different solvents will thin at different rates dependent upon the solvent's viscosity.
Which is why ..... Oh never mind!

Jeffrey S. Brooks
11th November 2011, 01:43 PM
I have been checking the viscosity and specific gravity of all of the solvents I have used for my blending experiments. I have found solvents come in two classes. The lightest class is petrol-like, such as: acetone, MEK, lacquer thinner, etc. The second class is kerosene-like and includes: kerosene, naptha, etc. So, I resort to a basic blending formula, if the solvent is in class 1, then I blend at 20%; or if it is in class 2, then I blend at 30%. However, I also check the viscosity and specific gravity of my blend to make sure it is close to diesel fuel.