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Thread: DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

  1. #1
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    DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

    All,

    After much deliberation I have decided to upgrade the 1HZ and fit a hair dryer.

    I will do as much of it myself as possible, all of it if only the heavens allow.

    It will be a complete do over-

    • turbo kit
    • exhaust
    • intercooler
    • boost compensator
    • EGT and PSI gauges


    question - has anyone here swapped their altitude compensator for a boost compensator? I spoke with a couple of pump mechanics and they are happy to do it for me (at a premium of course). I would like to purchase the parts and do it myself. I see a very handy sticky from SmithW on this site with detailed photos and descriptions for pump overhaul, which will go a very long way for me.

    the rest is all pretty basic, its just this one bit I need some more info on.

    any help / advice is appreciated.

    thanks again guys!
    Regards,

    Cade.

    2002 100 series Landcruiser
    240,000 Km and counting on B100, 330,000km total on car.
    Naturally aspirated, Walbro Pusher pump just upstream of tank switch valves, Cav filter with reversed fuel flow direction.
    At 160,000 km Rebuilt pump, Reconditioned head and manifolds, glow plugs. Injectors all good after 160,000 km on B100.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    WA
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    4,095

    Re: DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

    Isn't an altitude compensator the same thing as a boost compensator?
    They do the same thing. Surely, at most, you may need to adjust the max fuel at full boost.
    Life is a journey, with problems to solve, lessons to learn, but most of all, experiences to enjoy.

    Current Vehicles in stable:
    '85 Mercedes Benz W123 300CD Turbodiesel single tank using 95% used cooking oil and 5% to 10% misfuel (where someone had filled diesel vehicle with petrol).
    '06 Musso Sports Crew Cab. Running on used cooking oil with 5% to 10% misfuel.
    Toyota Camry Hybrid - (Wife's Car)

    Previous Vehicles:
    '90 Mazda Capella. (2000 - 2003) My first Fatmobile. Converted to fun on veggie oil with a 2 tank setup. Died when supercharger stuck at max boost for weeks. Stretched head bolts.
    '80 Mercedes 300D. 2 tank conversion [Sold]
    '84 Mercedes 300D. 1 tank, no conversion. Replaced engine with rebuilt OM617A turbodiesel engine. Finally had good power. Donor for current Fatmobile coupe. (body parted out and carcass sold for scrap.)
    '99 Mercedes W202 C250 Turbodiesel (my darling Wife's car)[sold]
    '98 Mercedes W202 C250 Turbodiesel (my car)[sold]
    Parts Car C220 1993 All body panels, headlights, interior engine and ECU available.


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  3. #3
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    Re: DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony From West Oz View Post
    Isn't an altitude compensator the same thing as a boost compensator?
    They do the same thing. Surely, at most, you may need to adjust the max fuel at full boost.
    Hi Tony,

    they operate very similar, but the altitude compensator doesn't have any where near the range of fuel regulation the boost compensator does

    i was very impressed with the ability to make fine adjustment to fuel flow before boost, low boost, on boost and overall flow. My Mazda has one and once I understood how to make the adjustments the adjustability is excellent.

    You can acheive no smoke at all through the entire range and not overfuel or worry about cooking it. My wife drives it 90% of the time so I need it to be smokeless and reliable as she won't be watching temps or boost pressures.
    Regards,

    Cade.

    2002 100 series Landcruiser
    240,000 Km and counting on B100, 330,000km total on car.
    Naturally aspirated, Walbro Pusher pump just upstream of tank switch valves, Cav filter with reversed fuel flow direction.
    At 160,000 km Rebuilt pump, Reconditioned head and manifolds, glow plugs. Injectors all good after 160,000 km on B100.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    In the sunshine state.
    Posts
    853

    Re: DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

    What boost levels? 1 Hz is not good for high levels keep them low for longevity, Having said that my 1 HDFT is good for 30 PSIm the 1Hz I would conservatively do 7-8 PSI. If you need it I have a HDFTE intercooler, small but useful for nix? I know of another too so two for nil?
    Biodiesel Bandit

    Landcruiser '98 80 series B100.

  5. #5
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    Re: DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    What boost levels? 1 Hz is not good for high levels keep them low for longevity, Having said that my 1 HDFT is good for 30 PSIm the 1Hz I would conservatively do 7-8 PSI. If you need it I have a HDFTE intercooler, small but useful for nix? I know of another too so two for nil?
    Hey Matt,

    I would be crazy to say no that offer! thanks heaps. I will PM you.

    I don't want it to break records or anything, just need some extra go up the hills and towing. I think it would make a big difference to driveability around town in traffic too.

    I had in my mind 7 Psi as a minimum and around 10 as a max too. this is based on a few good reads on the net and forums etc.

    I really want to do it all myself, don't want to pay a thief to work on it. I have had a bad run in paying people to work on my fuel pumps over time.

    Still missing some info though (I will probably just have a crack it if don't find the info, it can't be that hard if I take my time and document it as I go along). Would like to know how to change the compensators over and also what a rule of thumb for turning up the fuel is to achieve between 7 and 10 psi before I start doing some runs to fine tune it.

    if there are any experienced turbo installers reading this, I would love to hear from you.
    Regards,

    Cade.

    2002 100 series Landcruiser
    240,000 Km and counting on B100, 330,000km total on car.
    Naturally aspirated, Walbro Pusher pump just upstream of tank switch valves, Cav filter with reversed fuel flow direction.
    At 160,000 km Rebuilt pump, Reconditioned head and manifolds, glow plugs. Injectors all good after 160,000 km on B100.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    In the sunshine state.
    Posts
    853

    Re: DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

    The biggest issue with the 1Hz turbo is cracked pistons, they are simply not up to much boost, I would make 7 the max personally, there is a risk even there. Definately add an intercooler to lower thermal stress, water injection would not hrt either to lower combustion temps by latent heat of evaporation of H2O. Turbo will hurt a little $ !

    Just about to put a better turbo in my beast, 25psi is quite possible which will liven it up, But it is a factory turbo, known to be good for this.
    Biodiesel Bandit

    Landcruiser '98 80 series B100.

  7. #7
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    Re: DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

    Hey Matt,

    Sorry, I didn't return your call, it has been pretty busy here the last week or so, I will explain on the phone when I get hold of you.

    I thought the only difference between the 1HZ and HDFT was the head arrangement? Now I think about it, it probably does have a different crown to the piston to accommodate the valve layout. is that all they changed between motors?

    yes it will be a full fit - intercooler included. I hadn't considered the water injection, I will pick your brain on this one...

    7 PSI seems a bit pedestrian though? having said that I havent done this before so am keen to explore safely.
    Regards,

    Cade.

    2002 100 series Landcruiser
    240,000 Km and counting on B100, 330,000km total on car.
    Naturally aspirated, Walbro Pusher pump just upstream of tank switch valves, Cav filter with reversed fuel flow direction.
    At 160,000 km Rebuilt pump, Reconditioned head and manifolds, glow plugs. Injectors all good after 160,000 km on B100.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    4,095

    Re: DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

    Cade,
    Atmospheric pressure is ~14psi, so 7psi boost can give you up to a 50% power increase (theoretically) with inter-cooling, etc
    So a 100Hp engine would become a 150Hp engine.
    Many other things can be done to improve the airflow/max fueling of a stock engine and hence its power output. The limit on fueling is the black smokescreen that you could leave, but that is just wasted fuel.
    Most turbo manifolds are just a pipe to collect the exhaust gases which are dumped into the turbo. Improvements can be made by improving the exhaust flow (extractor style modifications)
    It would be possible to get more than 50% increase in power and still have only 7psi boost.

    Sounds like you are going to have fun.
    Life is a journey, with problems to solve, lessons to learn, but most of all, experiences to enjoy.

    Current Vehicles in stable:
    '85 Mercedes Benz W123 300CD Turbodiesel single tank using 95% used cooking oil and 5% to 10% misfuel (where someone had filled diesel vehicle with petrol).
    '06 Musso Sports Crew Cab. Running on used cooking oil with 5% to 10% misfuel.
    Toyota Camry Hybrid - (Wife's Car)

    Previous Vehicles:
    '90 Mazda Capella. (2000 - 2003) My first Fatmobile. Converted to fun on veggie oil with a 2 tank setup. Died when supercharger stuck at max boost for weeks. Stretched head bolts.
    '80 Mercedes 300D. 2 tank conversion [Sold]
    '84 Mercedes 300D. 1 tank, no conversion. Replaced engine with rebuilt OM617A turbodiesel engine. Finally had good power. Donor for current Fatmobile coupe. (body parted out and carcass sold for scrap.)
    '99 Mercedes W202 C250 Turbodiesel (my darling Wife's car)[sold]
    '98 Mercedes W202 C250 Turbodiesel (my car)[sold]
    Parts Car C220 1993 All body panels, headlights, interior engine and ECU available.


    Searching the Biofuels Forum using Google
    Adding images and/or documents to your posts


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    In the sunshine state.
    Posts
    853

    Re: DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

    Tony is on the money, the pistons certainly are different and I am fairly sure there was some block stiffening. Certainly between the 80 series 1HDFT and 100 series 1HDFTE there is block strengthening but pistons remain the same, Piston damage is common in turbo 1HZ's. Watch out, the more power the more likely so as advised keep fuelling as it is and add more air, this will aid things along quite well.

    So I would keep it very conservative, if your up for piston replacement? Two 100 series coolers and some pipework in the passenger foot well of my 80.
    Biodiesel Bandit

    Landcruiser '98 80 series B100.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Sydney, NSW
    Posts
    195

    Re: DIY swapping altitude compensator for boost compensator Bosch VE

    Apologies in advance if any of this is already common knowledge...just a bit of brain dump.

    I'm sure the 1HDT is a fairly different engine to the 1HZ. Definitely the head and head gasket & pistons are different for different compression ratios. Connecting rods are stronger and there are oil squirters to the underside of the pistons for cooling (similar to the turbo variants of Mercedes diesel engines). As a result these things can be run in excess of 20 PSI boost with appropriate precautions. Some go up to 30 PSI, but I think that is pushing the boundaries. I had a mate who went a little bit silly with his up to 30 PSI and bent some rods....something like $10K later for a full rebuild.

    Having said that, there are plenty of naturally aspirated diesel engines that have been retrofitted with turbos that are still going strong many years and many thousands of km later and many, many 1HZs, provided they are conservatively tuned.

    In the research I've done over the years, I think the most important factor is exhaust gas temperature in the first instance and boost pressure in the second. Adding boost to a NA engine should reduce EGTs unless more fuel is added. And unless you add more fuel on boost, you won't see the power benefits (I am running into this issue on my Mercedes). But adding more fuel without a boost compensator on the fuel pump = smoke down low + high EGTs. Plumb the EGT probe in the intake manifold pre-turbo rather than post-turbo in the dump pipe. Go for a quality mechanical gauge like VDO rather than the Auber Instruments electronic gauge. I have the latter and it is problematic at times. Max 550 C seems to be the conservative figure to run at.

    Find out what ARB run their boost at and don't go too far above that. A bleed on the wastegate actuator is a cheap and easy way to adjust the boost.

    Adding LPG injection seems to be a good way to improve turbo diesel performance without overfuelling, but is $$$$.

    Intercooling is definitely worthwhile. I put a water-to-air on my Rodeo and it is still going strong more than 18 months later. Cost about $250 all up to make. Top mount air-to-airs aren't as efficient as front-mounts, but take up less space and won't compromise air flow through your radiator or AC condenser. I have increased the fuelling and added 60+% to horsepower and torque (as measured by a dyno) with manageable EGTs and conservative boost of up to 15 PSI, but this is factory turbo engine.

    I would also consider water-methanol injection - approx $500 AUD for the bottom-of-the-line Cooling Mist system from the US - see eBay, they have even cheaper runout models on there that would work fine in this application. It seems to work well on my Mercedes which has no intercooler. It is an NA engine retrofitted with a turbo that normally runs under 10 PSI. Think of it as a chemical intercooler. Latent heat of vaporisation sucks heat from the compressed air.

    Don't use a turbo that is too big. I have this problem on my Merc. There is not enough fuelling / exhaust gas to spool it up properly down low. G-turbo in WA make amazing units for the 1HDT that produce lots of boost at very low RPM and you can sometimes pick them up secondhand for a fraction of the price (they don't seem to work so well on auto vehicles). You can probably buy a new Chinese copy of the 1HDT turbo on eBay for under $500 too I suppose. For ease of fitment, maybe the exhaust manifold from the 1HDT bolts straight up to the 1HZ? Worth a look.

    Here’s good read that Tony put me onto. For Mercs, but relevant to all turbo diesels I guess.

    https://mercedesforum.com/forum/dies...tenance-46097/

    The one thing I disagree with in this is the bit about putting a bigger / freer flowing exhaust on making no difference to power. This may or may not be true on a Merc TD, but it does wonders for Japanese vehicles. I think it is a universal truth for turbos that any back pressure is to be avoided where possible. And who doesn't like the sweet sound of a turbo spooling up?
    Last edited by 3DB; 20th June 2017 at 09:54 PM.
    3DB
    1995 Holden (Isuzu) Rodeo 2.8TD 4X4 - B100 since April 2013
    1976 Mercedes 300D Turbo 'The Coal Grenade' - B100 since May 2016
    (@thirddegreeburns on Instagram)

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