Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 43

Thread: Pressing oil from acorns

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    4

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    Well - I am going for my fist batch today.
    I will see what I can do to get as much as I can out of the acorns I have.
    At this time, acorns are not all that available!
    Will let you know any yield numbers I get along with any species information I have.

    I should be able to get some Scarlet Oak nuts soon, hopefully enough to try a batch.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Foresthill, CA
    Posts
    2

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    El Jefe,
    You are lucky to have acorns this time of year! I am anxious to try pressing acorn oil but will have to wait 'till late Oct. to actually get some acorns. Looking forward to seeing what kind of results you get from yours.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    4

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    Well, gents - I am sadly dissapointed.
    The paper quoted above mentions that a 4% yield of oil was noted from white oak in Canada (Quercus alba). I was hoping that the species I have (Quercus fusiformis) acorns of (they are a little older and dry) would have a better yield. Alas, I have acheived Acorn flour!
    And I am stuck. It is a little oily, I can see that it clumps together. I do not have access to a centrifuge, so I am at a loss as to how to separate the solids from the oil to measure out the yield. Water has crossed the mind, but I think it may just make a mess.
    October will be a better target for any new experiments, and I will begin investigating how Peanut oil is extracted - as the peeled acorns are very like a peanut.
    BTW - out of 9.5 oz of acorns, I got 4.0 oz of shells and residue and 5.5 oz of actual acorn nuts.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    4,152

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    El Jefe,
    Canola seed is around 35 - 42% oil by weight. Cold pressing can extract about 85 - 90% of that oil, leaving some in the meal. Solvent extraction can get the rest of the oil out of the Canola meal.

    Starting with just 4% oil in the acorns will definately make it difficult to extract any of the oil without solvent extraction techniques.

    I agree that water would not be the best additive to recover the oil from the meal (otherwise the commercial plants would be using it rather than Hexane.)

    Tony

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    4

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    Trying one last thing, before moving to other potential sources.
    Just an FYI - corn is one of the least effective crops used for oil at this time, with pecans being the most "oily" for availability in the US. Peanuts, which have a similar consistency as acorns are at arround the high end, better than sunflower.
    Will try my last experiment until new acorns are available and keep you guys posted.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    I extracted ground acorn nuts with acetone. Removed the acetone and water by vacuum distillation to produce crude oil. Extracted the crude oil oil with hexanes (lighter fluid) to produce fairly pure glyceryl tri-fatty acids. Then I made crude methyl biodiesel from the acorn oil. It works just fine. I got 25.6% by weight, of oil from acorn nuts. Acorns are about 2/3 nuts by weight and 1/3 of the weight was shells (about). Extracting the crude oil with hexanes removes tannic acid that is present . Dr Eddie Luzik at University of New Hampton in the USA said extracting with acetone might be a problem due to condensation products.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    I got 25.6% by weight, of oil from FRESH acorn nuts, using solvent extraction method. On a large scale, solvent recovery is necessary or the cost of product is too high to be comercially viable. I sent this green fuel biodiesel product information into the USA government, but they paid me nothing. Here the government takes advantage of inventors like me. Used to, an inventor could get wealthy in the USA, but now the fuel industry has people who are like piranas , grabbing a bite of my products/inventions/research results who pay nothing. It is kind of like, the government would rather pay the thieves of an invention than pay the inventor.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    Using fresh acorns when extracting oil is better because two of the fatty acids involved have double bond/bonds. The fatty acids go rancid. I stored acorns for two to four weeks in small plastic bags at room temperature. When I started to shell the previously stored acorns, the nuts had turned from yellow to almost black, indictating a chemical reaction had occurred. So... it is probably best to use fresh acorns in making biodiesel. For the solvent extraction method of making acorn oil, many non-polar solvents will do it. I choose acetone because it is available and relatively cheap in the area I live in and it has a low boiling point. I would say don't use chlorinated solvents because you can't get it all out and then you've got chlorine in your motor fuel which might make poison exhaust gasses and cause internal corrosion in the motor. I don't yet have all the answers on this subject but I've got some of them. Thanks

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    I made Methyl Biodiesel from palm kernel oil using fairly dry methanol. It worked fine. I tried to make Ethyl Biodiesel using 95% ethanol/water as the alcohol reactant. It didn't work to make Ethyl Biodiesel. Since only a little glycerine was produced in the 95% ethanol process, it probably made soap out of my Lye catalyst. Next I tried to make Ethyl Biodiesel using 99.5% ethanol, lye , palm kernel oil...it worked just fine to produce mostly Ethyl Biodiesel. Since dry (anhydrous) ethanol is expensive, I've ruled out making ethyl biodiesel as a commercial product motor fuel. In the Lye, glyceryl tri-fatty acid, alcohol process using dry ethanol costs too much to be commercially viable as a motor fuel. Also I learn from this that the trans-esterification reaction ought to be as dry as possible when done. In an equilibrium reaction where water is one of the produts, then generally, wet reactants inhibits formation of products (pushes the equilibrium to the left, or elsewhere than what is desired). Acorn oil can be used in place of palm kernel oil to make biodiesel. There are no palm trees where I live only Oak (acorn producers) Trees, lots of Oak Trees.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    ลึก ประเทศอินเด&
    Posts
    1,988

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    Quote Originally Posted by WesleyB View Post
    I got 25.6% by weight, of oil from FRESH acorn nuts, using solvent extraction method... I sent this green fuel biodiesel product information into the USA government, but they paid me nothing.
    Do you think your method of extracting the oil is so unique and different from other solvent extraction methods in common use that you should have been paid for the information you provided?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •