Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 43

Thread: Pressing oil from acorns

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    I produced chemistry research information mostly independently and submitted it to people that probably didn't know about it. In the USA there's a fuel problem. Even the President asked for innovation relative to green renewable fuels. They ought to reimburse me my costs and maybe even give me a nice shiny medal. I'm working on my next batch now will report back in a few days or weeks on it. I'm only making about 1/4 litre, probably.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    ลึก ประเทศอินเด&
    Posts
    1,983

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    Quote Originally Posted by WesleyB View Post
    They ought to reimburse me my costs and maybe even give me a nice shiny medal.
    Please accept this medal from a greatful nation


  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    Pressing oil from acorns might not be as productive as solvent extraction. I extracted 25.6% by weight of red oil from acorns using solvent extraction method. The oil I produced (about a year ago) was so pure crystals were growing in it. I read a report on the computer that said the Russians got 4-5% oil. Anyway the acorns I used as my raw material were from the Nuttall Oak Trees that are found in East Texas and else where. I'm now working on another batch using acetone solvent extraction. On a large scale acetone extraction might not be the best solvent to use. My records for oil extraction from acorns is lengthy and it is on a small scale, if you want to know let me know and I'll type it onto this forum. Thanks to the man who awarded me a medal from a grateful nation. If the Australians solve the acorn/biodiesel problem then eventually the Americans will get it, so I'll help the Australians solve it.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    Acorns have a high content of tannin, a bitter compound used to tan hides. Tannins are a class of compounds. Tannic Acid (C76H52O46) is now selling for $48.59 American Dollars for about 4 ounces. Tannic acid is very soluble in water. Tannins should be removed from biodiesel from acorn oil before fueling up the car with it. I expect tannins can not be vaporized in a motor's combustion chamber. Purifying tannins from acorns as part of extracting oil from acorns might be a monetary bonus in making biodiesel. Purified tannins are not a worthless byproduct.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    Shelling acorns by hand took me a long time, prior to extracting the oil. So I looked for industrial shelling pecans on the internet to find, there are large pecan shelling plants that have the capacity of cracking open 150,000 pounds of pecans per day. All such plants use cold storage...both shelled and unshelled can be stored in such plants. I expect pecan shelling machines can be modified to shell acorns. Pressing canola oil is done without the husk. Presence of the husk during pressing lowers the amount of oil product from the pressing operation. So, I expect acorns should be shelled before pressing or using a solvent extraction method to obtain the oil. The acorns I'm experimenting with have tannins in them. I found on the internet that some type of tannin can cause anemia in people, maybe in some animals too. So, removing tannins from the residual meal after pressing ought to be done if it is to be used to feed animals.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    In an earlier post I said I used lye in the transesterification reaction. I looked in a chemistry book and have found that more pure sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide should be used instead of (inexpensive) lye drain cleaner. I remember from quantitative analysis chemistry class that lye is 5-10% calcium hydroxide plus sodium hydroxide. It is difficult to remove the calcium from the finished biodiesel product , but not so difficult to remove sodium or potassium. Sorry if this caused anybody a temporary problem.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    easter states
    Posts
    2

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    (browser crashed, so you are going to get a less revised version.)

    If this is truly what you are looking to do, read 'Tree Crops' by J. Russell Smith. Published in 1929 and updated in 1953. He has done the research. Read it to get a better understanding of tree crops productions and potentials.

    To do what you are talking about, I would look at increasing current tree productivity by, graft better varieties onto trees you already have, reduce competition (grasses, similar trees, etc), increase nutrients for your trees (water, nitrogen fixers, minerals, soil health) and adding some animals to the mix. When it comes to getting the most from the nuts, consider getting as much oil from the nuts as possible with the least amount of work / input as possible. Pigs will eat the left over nut meal and produce more oil when you slaughter them. They will also collect the nuts for you, so you can get rid of all of that labor. You may have to plant some other tree crops for them to eat throughout the year. Most of the work as already been done for you. If you like eating pig, you can eat them and run your car off of them. Chickens and other animals can be used also.

    Getting your fuel from multiple sources is probably the best longterm strategy and least risky. Example, acorns, sunflowers and a good seed bearing fabaceae/leguminosae species combined with animal fats, algae, etc. You will end up with more fuel, food, and fun than you know what to do with.

    hope that helps someone.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    I extracted oil from about one pound, fresh, ground, shelled acorns using acetone. Removed most of the acetone. Extracted the acetone extract with hexanes (lighter fluid). Did vacuum distillation on the hexanes extract, removing most of the solvents and water. To get 4.38% by weight of orange/yellow acorn oil. I'm not used to working with such small quantities but I will proceed to try to make methyl biodiesel from the 23.4 grams of fairly pure acorn oil that I got in about a week or two. I intend to report back when I can.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    ลึก ประเทศอินเด&
    Posts
    1,983

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    Hi Wesle,
    You seem confused.
    Lye is either Potassium Hydroxide or Sodium Hydroxide. Drain cleaner usually contains lye plus other things such as aluminium.It is best not to use drain cleaner for the reaction.
    Quote Originally Posted by WesleyB View Post
    In an earlier post I said I used lye in the transesterification reaction. I looked in a chemistry book and have found that more pure sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide should be used instead of (inexpensive) lye drain cleaner. I remember from quantitative analysis chemistry class that lye is 5-10% calcium hydroxide plus sodium hydroxide. It is difficult to remove the calcium from the finished biodiesel product , but not so difficult to remove sodium or potassium. Sorry if this caused anybody a temporary problem.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    280

    Re: Pressing oil from acorns

    I mixed 20 ml methanol with 0.2 grams of Potassium Hydroxide. Added the methanol solution to 23.4 grams acorn oil in a boiling flask. Stoppered the flask using stopcock grease and stopper. Heated at about 60 degrees centigrade for 2 1/2 hours. A reaction occurred producing a three layer liquid product. The bottom layer was dark brown (probably) glycerine. The middle layer (phase) was about a lavender color, and probably was the biodiesel. The top layer was redish and I think it is probably a layer (phase) consisting of methanol. I got hasty and discarded the lower two layers. But my point is that the reaction worked even for this tiny quantity. The methanol was present in excess. My calculations indicated I could have used less methanol for this reaction.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •