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Thread: Soy Biodiesel @ TBS

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    76

    Soy Biodiesel @ TBS

    The Soy-based Biodiesel that is being sold at The Biodiesel Station has a CFPP (Cold Filter Plug Point) of -4C, complies with both the Australian Standard & EN14214 (the EU standard), and compliant with the BQ-9000, the US Biodiesel Quality Certification Program. It is not a cheap fuel, but it is consistent, high quality, and every litre purchased contributes to the Australian Biodiesel industry. If you want more information about he SoybiodieselŪ go to the National Biodiesel Website. National Biofuels Group
    Morris Lyda
    [URL=http://www.thebiodieselstation.com]
    The Biodiesel Station

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    30

    Re: Soy Biodiesel @ TBS

    Thanks Morris - I got some of this from you the other day (and the load before that), and have no major complaints. I certainly like running B100 in colder temperatures, after having filter issues twice now due to my forgetfullness on your previous B100! (My fault entirely).

    The only thing I have noticed is slightly less economy - one car up from 6 to 7 l/100km (trip computer) and the other at a gut feeling from 5 to 6 (not measured). Still, as long as the costs are comparable I consider this a small price to pay for B100 through winter.

    Thanks again for keeping the bio pumping.
    Moved from bio to Electrons - Nissan Leaf

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    76

    Re: Soy Biodiesel @ TBS

    Hi Reverb,
    There is a small difference in the energy content of various Biodiesel feedstocks. The oils that are long-chain saturated fatty acids (tallow & palm) generally exhibit better ignition properties than short-chain highly unsaturated oils (Soy & Sunflower). However, the trade-off is the cold weather properties of the better ignition oils is poor & oils with lower cetane numbers have excellent cold weather properties.

    Canola is a great in-between oil as it is high in monosaturates and exhibits good ignition & cold weather properties. Canola is compromised by two factors: 1) Bloody Expensive & 2) Competes with human food resources, therefore is not an ideal raw material for producing Biodiesel.

    So the increased fuel consumption that you are seeing, and it shouldn't be significant, is something you will have to live with in the short-term if you want to use Biodiesel in the winter.

    TBS is working with Freedom Fuels to develop a soy/tallow B100 blend that offers good cetane and cold-flow properties. Perhaps it will be available next winter. Try to collect some real consumption data, I would be interested in learning about the result of your little experiment. Happy Motoring!
    ML
    Morris Lyda
    [URL=http://www.thebiodieselstation.com]
    The Biodiesel Station

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