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Thread: Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Kojounp W.A.
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    Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

    I have been reading the posts on common rail and bio issues and thought it might be a good idea to start a thread where anyone that is using b100 in a common rail can share their experiences for thoes of us who are contemplation on doing the same.

    There is a lot of mis-information and hazy facts about common rail IPs and bio so lets get down to the facts and clean out the bullshit.
    I am looking at buying a Toyota v8 troopy diesel and want to run my B100 in it, I also am going to buy a new BT50 Mazda work ute to do the same.
    So I am looking for accurate 1st hand accounts of users who have or are having problems and what they have learned in solving them.

    I will kick it off.
    I have been making and using B100 in a 2004 Ford F350 7.3ltr v8 intercooled turbo diesel for 60 000klms. I have replaced 2 inline electric pickup pumps costing $750 each during that time due to thick cold bio overloading the pump. Solution was to mix 40% normal diesel during the colder months or when temps drop below 8 degrees C.
    The other issue that is coming to my attention is I suspect that there is some soap or glycering build up in the injector tips as the engine does not have the soft purr it should have at idle. I am going to run a high concentration of injector cleaner in the next three tanks to see if it comes good.
    I should point out that this engine is not a common rail diesel design, however the injectors are oil operated and each injector increases the injection pressure up to 29000psi (so I have been informed). Thereby giving it a high pressure injection simular to the common rail engine design.
    Im a farmer and not a mechanic so please excuse my lack of technical knowledge. However I should also point out that the engine was made by Navstar USA and is used in the Case tractors, Case have released a media statement last year endorsing the use of Biodiesel in their late model trators.
    So far I am very happy with the performance and benefits of using B100 in this engine. I would recomend using B100 in these engines without concern.

    Foot note: I do not wash my bio as I have issues with water and diesel. Instead I demeth my bio and leave it to settle for three months before using it. My feed stock is 2% ffa virgin tallow, and I use the base/base method with KOH. Titration is between 1 and 1.5 (plus base of 7 = 8 to 8.5 g of KOH per liter of tallow) process at temp of 60 c.

    My next project is to build a vacume 1 day processor simular to Graham Lamings GL1 system and reduce the lag time between manufacture and use, as well as recover the methanol and improve the quality.

    Happy new year all.
    I hope 2010 is a good one for everybody.
    Cheers
    Sandman.

  2. #2
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    Dec 2007
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    Re: Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandman View Post
    I should point out that this engine is not a common rail diesel design, however the injectors are oil operated and each injector increases the injection pressure up to 29000psi (so I have been informed). Thereby giving it a high pressure injection simular to the common rail engine design.
    The big difference is that each injector increases the injection pressure up to 29000psi whereas the common rail IP generates the high pressure which is then in the common rail and the injectors are just solenoid operated nozzles that do not change the pressure.

  3. #3
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    Apr 2009
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    Mooroolbark
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    Re: Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

    Its a good topic. And ill jeep an eye on it to help me. I recently have got a 2005 3.0lt turbo diesel patrol, and the injectors are up at 29kpsi. Reading forums about it, it suggests not to use it at all. There have been cases of water gettingin, and blowing the pump apart etc, and to fix is anything up to $6000 if not more. However, some are using the bio from stations but having a mix of it, and also adding extra fuel filters with water catchment to them as well. Im still learning on this type of engine to yet try it. but seems definately dry and let sit for a while before using and prob a mix. In regards to the troopy, that doesnt have a problem with the bio so i hear as i think its the 1hz motor? Im still learning on my engine, and when satisifed if its worth it, then ill try, so ill keep an eye on this thread, thanks

  4. #4
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    Re: Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

    Quote Originally Posted by Moyston View Post
    Its a good topic. And ill jeep an eye on it to help me. I recently have got a 2005 3.0lt turbo diesel patrol, and the injectors are up at 29kpsi. Reading forums about it, it suggests not to use it at all. There have been cases of water gettingin, and blowing the pump apart etc, and to fix is anything up to $6000 if not more. However, some are using the bio from stations but having a mix of it, and also adding extra fuel filters with water catchment to them as well. Im still learning on this type of engine to yet try it. but seems definately dry and let sit for a while before using and prob a mix. In regards to the troopy, that doesnt have a problem with the bio so i hear as i think its the 1hz motor? Im still learning on my engine, and when satisifed if its worth it, then ill try, so ill keep an eye on this thread, thanks
    V8 troopy is not 1Hz - it is common rail, D4D Toyota call it.
    3.0lt turbo diesel patrol (ZD30) is nicknamed 'the grenade' because they give so much trouble. You will have trouble with this engine and if you use bio it will get the blame.

  5. #5
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    Re: Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

    oh right, yer i wasnt sure what the engine was, but i know the 1hz motor was ok with the bio. ( being so technically minded) ...i think.

    well in reagrds to mine, the grenade model was about the 2000-2003 models. I had a 2000 4.2 td and a 2002 3.o ltr, and they both never gave me an ounce of trouble. No leaks, nothing. and they went right up to 200k .
    Now ive got the 2005, they changed the engines on some of the models and improved them. the 2000-3 models were made in the thousands, and you know what its like. you never hear of people saying good things about them, but the bad ones, everyone hears about them. this model, yer id agree, will have to look into yet to continue to make it for this car. But then again, i know 3 people in QLd who are using bio for 2 years and i asked them last week how it was going and no probs yet at all. anyway, didnt want to steal this thread.
    I think you will be fine with the troopy to use bio, ive herd others and read others do and no probs. its the feul pump , and it doesnt have a prob with it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Kojounp W.A.
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    Re: Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

    (Bumping it up to the top !)

    Any one with a common rail on B100 care to contribute to this thread ?

    Cheers
    Sandman

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    In the sunshine state.
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    Re: Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

    Yes, ran it for 60K km from new before material issues gave problems, seals, injector bleed lines and sealants. Only issue will be material compatibility and if you have DPF, the extra injection can lead to engine oil dilution / polymerisation / gumming up. This latter issue is only over a long period, change the oil regularly and its not hard. No other issues.

    Matt
    Biodiesel Bandit

    Landcruiser '98 80 series B100.

  8. #8
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    Re: Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    Yes, ran it for 60K km from new before material issues gave problems, seals, injector bleed lines and sealants. Only issue will be material compatibility and if you have DPF, the extra injection can lead to engine oil dilution / polymerisation / gumming up. This latter issue is only over a long period, change the oil regularly and its not hard. No other issues.

    Matt
    what type of car was it yr running and did u add any filters or anything diff to the car?

  9. #9
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    Dec 2008
    Location
    brisbane
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    Re: Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

    Sandman,
    I too run a PowerStroke 7.3 on 100% Bio and it loves it. One of the reasons these engines run so well on Bio is due to the fact that the fuel is fed to the injectors via galleries within the head casting. The fuel is nice and hot before the pressure is intensified within the injector. I thoroughly water wash and dry, and pass my Bio through a Golden Rod "Water Block" cartridge filter before it is pumped into the vehicle. I also have fitted an extra filter/water trap on the chassis rail. And to date, after about 35,000 kms., have never drained a drop of water or glycerin from the filter. I believe my Bio to be completely free of any contaminants.
    Back to common rail. I run my wife's 2.0l TDI VW Golf on 30% Bio and as soon as it is out of warranty intend to ramp it up to 100%. Frankly I don't expect any problems as these engines are sold to run on Bio in Europe.
    You may like to look here for an explanation of the Navistar injection system:- PowerStroke
    Last edited by 250downunder; 3rd April 2010 at 08:53 PM. Reason: Brain fade

  10. #10
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    Aug 2006
    Location
    Kojounp W.A.
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    Re: Common Rail engines using b100 diesel

    Quote Originally Posted by 250downunder View Post
    Sandman,
    I too run a PowerStroke 7.3 on 100% Bio and it loves it. One of the reasons these engines run so well on Bio is due to the fact that the fuel is fed to the injectors via galleries within the head casting. The fuel is nice and hot before the pressure is intensified within the injector. I thoroughly water wash and dry, and pass my Bio through a Golden Rod "Water Block" cartridge filter before it is pumped into the vehicle. I also have fitted an extra filter/water trap on the chassis rail. And to date, after about 35,000 kms., have never drained a drop of water or glycerin from the filter. I believe my Bio to be completely free of any contaminants.
    Back to common rail. I run my wife's 2.0l TDI VW Golf on 30% Bio and as soon as it is out of warranty intend to ramp it up to 100%. Frankly I don't expect any problems as these engines are sold to run on Bio in Europe.
    You may like to look here for an explanation of the Navistar injection system:- PowerStroke
    Thanks 250downunder I found the link very intersting, I now have a better understanding of my Powerstroke. Did you know that Case corporation origionaly developed this engine for its tractors 20 years ago and have been steadly refining it since. It is a proven workhorse. They have also supported B100 being used in it, there was a press release about two years ago on their web site supporting the use of B100 in all post 1998 case tractors. (including the navstar 7.3 powerstoke)
    Cheers
    Sandman
    Last edited by Sandman; 3rd April 2010 at 09:47 PM.

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