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Murphy2000
8th March 2007, 03:05 PM
I sold my Biodiesel Processor last month and got a lot of emails inquiring about how I built it. While I had many inquiries for purchase, most of the emails were asking for construction plans and prints.

After a month of drawing, I finally finished them. I've put together a set of do-it-yourself construction plans containing over 150 pages of step-by-step instructions and computer cad drawings for each part.

The information will show you how to build a high quality industrial grade biodiesel processor using all steel materials for safety.

You need a mig welder or tig welder.
This is a Farm size unit not for homeowner garage.

The plans also include some support to help make sure you are successful

If you have questions, please feel free to email me. My advice on making biodiesel is always free.

Check out,
Murphy's Machines (http://www.murphysmachines.com/biodiesel_processor.html)

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j237/Murphy2000/IMG_4906copy_Small.jpg

geewizztoo
9th March 2007, 07:46 AM
Very nice rig Murphy. Where do you get your cone bottom poly tank, RHS of the picture?

Murphy2000
9th March 2007, 02:09 PM
Thank you!

It makes great fuel and loads of it!

I got the cone bottom tank from some plastics place.. I forgot the name.. The farmer had a catalog and was ordering a big horizontal thing so I told him to get me one. That sucker was expensive!!!

I had to lift it up and extend the legs also so it would drain from a higher point.

I love that tank! I can wash 100 gallons in there at one time!

Biofuelnz
10th March 2007, 04:22 PM
Hi - What would the approximate cost be and construction time - nice rig
Regards
Mike

Murphy2000
11th March 2007, 12:00 PM
Hi - What would the approximate cost be and construction time - nice rig
Regards
Mike

Hi Mike,
The cost to construct the most basic parts needed is about $300. Maybe $400.. To construct the entire system would be around $1000.

$300 to $400 will get you enough built to make 45 gallons every few days. Spend some more money on more wash tanks and dry tank and you can produce even more.. Build the settling tower (tall tank) when your reactor is to busy to keep up.. The settling tower allows multiple batches in a single day..
How fast you construct it is up to your skills and tools. I can build the entire system in about 10 days.

Check out MurphysMachines.com.. click on the biodiesel processor link and read all the specs about it.

If you have any more questions, you can ask me here, or, email me using the contact us button.

THank you,

Robert
12th March 2007, 08:51 AM
I just thought I'd better add some conversions for the rest of the world as The US is the only place in the world to use US gallons and we are an Australian based forum after all. 45 gallons would be 170L.
Also US$300-400 would be AU$385-$515 or NZ$435-580. US$1000 would be AU$1,285 and NZ$1,450

Murphy2000
12th March 2007, 11:38 AM
I just thought I'd better add some conversions for the rest of the world as The US is the only place in the world to use US gallons and we are an Australian based forum after all. 45 gallons would be 170L.
Also US$300-400 would be AU$385-$515 or NZ$435-580. US$1000 would be AU$1,285 and NZ$1,450

Robert, thank you. I forgot this forum was down under!

Funny thing is that all my titration calculations and bio process is done in liters. I make 180 Liter batches but the reactor volume is more like 238 Liters.

The system is capable of making about 720 Liters a day and I've surpassed even that on a good day.

We here in the USA are kinda funny with our gallons and miles per hour.. The metric system is so much easier and better..,except for the Celsius scale.. That's screwed up..

joe
12th March 2007, 12:20 PM
Robert, thank you. I forgot this forum was down under!

Funny thing is that all my titration calculations and bio process is done in liters. I make 180 Liter batches but the reactor volume is more like 238 Liters.

The system is capable of making about 720 Liters a day and I've surpassed even that on a good day.

We here in the USA are kinda funny with our gallons and miles per hour.. The metric system is so much easier and better..,except for the Celsius scale.. That's screwed up..

freezing point is 0 and boiling is 100! What could be easier than that?? :)

David
12th March 2007, 12:22 PM
Water freezes at 0 and boils at 100.
How much simpler can you get? :D

Still, a very nice looking setup that gives bio production a nice professional and scientific credability.
Dosent look a lot Unlike something you would see in a milking shed.

Fitian
14th March 2007, 11:14 PM
a very nice looking setup that gives bio production a nice professional and scientific credability.


I could not say it any better. Fantastic job Murphy

Murphy2000
22nd March 2007, 07:54 AM
freezing point is 0 and boiling is 100! What could be easier than that?? :)

Hmm.. Yes. I suppose in those temperature ranges things make more sense..

Most of what I deal with is well above 100C or well below 0C.

I have never liked the metric temperature scale. In fact, I don't even care for ours either.

We should all stick to the Kelvin temperature scale.. Its univerasal and a lot easier to understand in the grand scale of things.

W123 x 2
22nd March 2007, 09:47 AM
The beauty of the metric system is it's integration.

1 litre of H2O = 10 cubic centimetres = 1 kilogram, which freezes at 0 degrees Celsius and boils at 100 degrees Celsius at sea level.

So whilst the Kelvin scale has it's applications in the grand scheme, the human scale, multiples of ten, and our familiarity with water as a reference point makes the metric system so appealing.

Only IMHO of course, Michael

Nice rig BTW

RODEONICK
2nd March 2008, 10:26 PM
The beauty of the metric system is it's integration.

1 litre of H2O = 10 cubic centimetres = 1 kilogram, which freezes at 0 degrees Celsius and boils at 100 degrees Celsius at sea level.

So whilst the Kelvin scale has it's applications in the grand scheme, the human scale, multiples of ten, and our familiarity with water as a reference point makes the metric system so appealing.

Only IMHO of course, Michael

Nice rig BTW
I believe that 1 litre is equal to 1000cubic centimetes not 10 cc.:)

Nuddy
12th March 2008, 03:58 PM
I believe that 1 litre is equal to 1000cubic centimetes not 10 cc.:)
Correct and 1 degree K is the same as 1 degree C the only difference is the starting point. 0C = 273K, 100C = 373K
I find it more convenient to use C