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Healthy Earth
15th June 2006, 03:23 PM
Fuel from Canola? Palm Oil? Biofuels are obviously going to be a large part of our future, although probably more as a transitional phase to even more sustainable methods.

When you consider the yeild of dryland (non irrigated) canola at approx 1.5 ton per acre with varying quality and a 40% to 50 % oil yeild per ton then it is going to take lots of acres to make significant quantities of biodiesel.
This is very good for the farmers for demand and price, so no doubt Canaola is going to be a good cash crop in the coming years. Appararently it is up to $800.00 per ton in europe.

Any crop that produces oil takes a lot of nutrients and minerals out of the ground. Unless good soil science is applied, yeilds and quality will drop dramaticaly very quickly, and this will affect the sustainability of the industry.
By the way,.. good quality seed is milled much faster with better yeild, this benefits the miller as well.
My business is sustainable agriculture using mineral soil technology to help produce high yeild, quality crops of all kinds. Our fertilizers make the crop more stress tolerent eg. more drought and disease resistant. We have been researching and developing products for this since about the mid 1960s.
In those days many of our peers (and the government) thought we were nuts refusing to use DDT and the Organochlorines, Organophosphates, etc. Today of course it is a different story, but the point is that we were decades in front of the industry and still are in many respects. We have many decades of experience in sustainable farming producing top quality commercial crops when the industry is only realizing that there is a desperate need for it...world wide!!
We do this with knowledge by incorporating huge numbers of minerals into our fertilizers. We also custom make the fertilizer for each individual farm in accordance to a good soil analysis and balance the farm soil at very competitive prices.
If we can improve the yield and quality by 25 to 50 percent then the farmer survives (well) for another year, and lets face it Australian farmers need all the help they can get.
If the farmer does not achieve the good yeild, grain supply will be restricted, prices will increase and the industry will flounder, losing its competitive edge and ability to supply bodiesel on demand.
If you are considering the business end of biodiesel from canola or palm etc, and are linked to the farmer then we will be happy to help with any questions.
Good soils make good oils!!

peter-linking
16th June 2006, 12:17 AM
Hi Peter,
As you know about the costs of feedstock in EU - Can you help me locate some figures? I am seeking some help on finding the costs that the biodiesel producers are paying for their feedstock.
Peter Link

Chris
16th June 2006, 11:49 AM
Hi Peter,
As you know about the costs of feedstock in EU - Can you help me locate some figures? I am seeking some help on finding the costs that the biodiesel producers are paying for their feedstock.
Peter Link
Hi Peter
Click on this link http://www.australianoilseeds.com/__data/page/44/Biodiesel_-_Fredrick_Suhren.pdf2 and Have a look It is a little bit out of date but it does cover a broad area as well as a whole field of different scenarios that will be helpfull to you
Chris

peter-linking
16th June 2006, 09:58 PM
Hi all,
Can anyone help?
I am seeking information on three points:
(1) What are the current prices that Biodiesel producers throughout Aussie are paying for their feedstock?
(2) What is the current production levels in Aussie of feedstock crops?
(3) What is Aussie's feedstock current and future requirements of biodiesel feedstock?
Thanks a lot,
Peter

peterlink
21st June 2006, 01:28 PM
Hi Chris,
Thanks for the information - It does not matter if it is a bit old as the main points I need is the trends.
Regards,
Peter

Chris
26th June 2006, 06:53 PM
Hi Chris,
Thanks for the information - It does not matter if it is a bit old as the main points I need is the trends.
Regards,
Peter
Hi there Peter
I am waiting for your response Check your email let me know if you did not get it
Cheers
Chris

darren leonadas
28th June 2006, 03:23 PM
Please guys , lets not push the market price for feed stock above 40c per litre, its hard enough for BD producers to survive the fed. gov.' s oxymoron " level playing field" NOT.
Check out my post at the end of another thread here. http://www.biofuelsforum.com/australian_biodiesel_industry_forum/199-small_scale_business_on_bd-3.html

giles
26th July 2006, 04:22 AM
I think the discussion on basic feed stock price is very interesting. Just recently there have been whispers in the market that the price is on the way up and is now beginning to effect the price of raw materials which are also used for food.

Only last week Goldman Sachs produced an interesting report taking a crystal ball to the future and have raised concerns over pricing, and the conflict between the food and biofuel markets.

Unfortunately, I think it is very unlikely that we will get a period of settled pricing for the forseeable future, as the market is still very young, and there are some sharks out there whol believe there is a quick buck to be made. Sadly they areprobably correct.

Giles

Chris
26th July 2006, 01:10 PM
I think the discussion on basic feed stock price is very interesting. Just recently there have been whispers in the market that the price is on the way up and is now beginning to effect the price of raw materials which are also used for food.

Only last week Goldman Sachs produced an interesting report taking a crystal ball to the future and have raised concerns over pricing, and the conflict between the food and biofuel markets.

Unfortunately, I think it is very unlikely that we will get a period of settled pricing for the forseeable future, as the market is still very young, and there are some sharks out there whol believe there is a quick buck to be made. Sadly they areprobably correct.

Giles
You are on the money on this one Giles Have a look at sugar prices The price is now quoted on a parity basis as the raw material for Ethanol rather than food (yield from cane)
That is no surprise as canola prices are on the way up as well as corn in the US as the preferred feedstock for Ethanol over there
Cheers
Chris