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  • WA government bans jatropha cultivation

    I have covered a news piece about the Western Australian State governement banning the cultivation of Jatropha:

    http://www.biofuelreview.com/content/view/28/2/

    I'd be interested in anyone's take on it. Is this likely to be repeated by other state, or indeed the Federal, government in Australia? If so what does this mean for the biofuel market in Australia?

    Any thoughts much appreciated.

    Giles
    giles
    Biofuels Forum Newbie
    Last edited by giles; 9 June 2006, 11:02 PM.
    a news service for the biofuel industry -

  • #2
    Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

    Good day Folks,
    I have read the post.I am baffled to say the least. Wander what the logic is of the WA govt. .This is probably a typical example of our polis being responsible to just a small lobby of power happy nitwits.Bastards.


    Can anyone in this forum please athuenticate this is the real case.
    As this could mean a number of implication both for Aus and for the region.
    I am personally involved in developing SHG network (Self help group) comprising of atleast 12,000 women below poverty line in India to get involved in Jatropha plantation for Bio Diesel production on a coop basis in the State of Assam in India.This will empower them in two years to not only have the basics of yearly sustenance but also raise there annual income from nothing to US$900 per year.The average of the country is US$240.
    Jatropha has been identified with years research on the plant as the preffered source for Bio Diesel in many countries.
    Dave who is in Cambodia is also involved in a similar project.

    Our govt needs to wake up.

    They need to get more informed and a proper panel needs to decide this consisting of technocrats,academics and adequate Research.Wander they have spent any tax payers money in this area.

    I wander what we can do in this forum to at least make the Australian public aware of the facts of Jatropha.
    Bet many will be shocked to hear that this plant along with it's other properties has medicinal values too.But then our ill informed govt might be swayed by just a few hoodwinked crooks...who may have realised that to keep the farming lobby supressed economic freedom must be deprived.
    As like in other countries Jatropha has the potential of developing our rural micro economy immensely.Australia could become the feedstock of Jatropha oil for the world.We have enough waste lands to boast about.
    So yes.I feel very very strongly against this.Need everyone help to see what we can do to at least make sure that the decision is reversed.

    Man this isn't funny.I will have guys in India (very very qualified people) who will take the Mickey outta me.In fact about 10 mins back a fellow activist from India said"oh...I get it....You are here in India propogating Jatropha cos they wont let you do it at home"...embarassing.
    Or stuff like...How do you guys call yourself a developed Nation when you pass false information to your people.I just keep quiet.
    I had my whinje ....back to work.....but we sure need to do something about it...

    cheers
    Sauman
    Kolkata,India

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

      I was aware of the 'declared plant' status, and that it was not permitted to be cultivated. I do not see any change in status from years ago. While it may be a great feedstock for biodiesel, there may be good reasons for not permitting plantations of it being set up.
      Don't complain too much about a Government being cautious, look at Queensland and the cane toad.
      Life is a journey, with problems to solve, lessons to learn, but most of all, experiences to enjoy.

      Current Vehicles in stable:
      '06 Musso Sports 4X4 Manual Crew Cab tray back.
      '04 Rexton 4X4 Automatic SUV
      '2014 Toyota Prius (on ULP) - Wife's car

      Previous Vehicles:
      '90 Mazda Capella. (2000 - 2003) My first Fatmobile. Converted to fun on veggie oil with a 2 tank setup.
      '80 Mercedes 300D. 2 tank conversion [Sold]
      '84 Mercedes 300D. 1 tank, no conversion. Replaced engine with rebuilt OM617A turbodiesel engine. Finally had good power. Engine donor for W123 coupe. (body parted out and carcass sold for scrap.)
      '85 Mercedes Benz W123 300CD Turbodiesel
      '99 Mercedes W202 C250 Turbodiesel (my darling Wife's car)[sold]
      '98 Mercedes W202 C250 Turbodiesel (my car)[sold]
      '06 Musso Sports Crew Cab well body. [Head gasket blew!]
      '04 Rexton SUV 2.9L Turbodiesel same as Musso - Our Family car.
      '06 Musso sports Crew Cab Trayback - My hack (no air cond, no heater).

      Searching the Biofuels Forum using Google
      Adding images and/or documents to your posts

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

        Agree with Tony, noxious weeds can be very, very bad news.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

          Hi Tony and Russell and everyone else in this forum,
          I do not disagree that the government should intervene and stop any thing that goes to harm the environment or has fall out effects.But just banning it without qualified information to the public is wrong in my oppinion.It was declared as a noxious weed long time back.Which means that controlled plantation is allowed and the responsibilty and onus lies on the farmer.Now banning it without providing qualified data I think is absurd.Tony don't read me wrong.I know about the cane toad syndrome and many other evils that our callous polis decide on to keep the vote bank happy.
          What I wanted to establish is why they have done so.I felt that this forum which is radical in itself to what we committed and doing for the environment should react to finding out the reason.
          As world wide there has been so much development and work done on this plant that is has been choosen as a very good source to replace fossil fuels in many countries.Did Australia engage in such research that qualifies their stand?.
          I dont want to debate on the issue anymore then this.

          Thanks

          Sauman

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

            Originally posted by Sauman
            Can anyone in this forum please athuenticate this is the real case.
            Yes Sauman I can. I reported it on www.biofuelreview.com after following up a press release from the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia.

            If you want to see the original release go here:
            http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/servlet/p...edia/index.htm

            According to the Director of Invasive Species with the Department of Agriculture and Food, Damian Collopy the reason for the ban is that;
            "These plants are heavily promoted on the Internet as source plants for biodiesel oil, and are being grown in developing countries. However, we regard the use of these plants to be too risky for Western Australian agriculture and the environment here," Mr Collopy said.

            "There are other plants that are highly suitable for biodiesel oil production in Western Australia. These include canola and mustard," he said.

            So there you go. You are always welcome to ask for sources for any article on www.biofuelreview, but we don't make stories up. Any piece that is opinion, or educated interpolation of what is happening will be clearly marked as such.

            Regards

            Giles
            a news service for the biofuel industry -

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

              Hi Giles,Thank you for info.
              Mr.Collopy rightly pointed out that mustard and canola have a huge potential for WA in fact throughout Aus.
              In fact clean cold pressed mustard oil has the highest omega 3 fatty acid and has been proved to reduce heart dieseas and has anti carcinogen properties.It can be mechanically harvested and is probabaly the single most virgin edible oil after virgin olive oil.
              It has been described having better or almost similar properties as Virgin Olive oil.
              Though it has a pungent odour which needs getting used to.Earlier I had posted my comments on the forum that mustard could not only act as BD oil source but has a potential for great export earnings.
              But must tell you that I am a bit suprised by the reasons given by Mr.Collopy about banning Jatropha.The reason highlighted was that it causes seriuos problems to cattle.
              By the way cattle don't touch that stuff(as they know they can get sick) also in many south east countries Jatropha is therefore used as fencing material to keep animals away.
              Jatropha grows on waste lands under very harsh conditions and that is why it is preffered as a feedstock as unutilised land can be made to be productive without compromising on prime farming land.I don't think cattle like grazing in arid lands.So the logic baffles me.Anyways I guess he calls the shots.
              But giles no offence mate.I understand where you are coming from.
              Keep on doing the great job.

              Cheers
              Sauman

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

                I have followed up on the issues with Jatropha in WA and have had the following reply:
                Dear Tony

                I talked to the weeds guy in DAFWA about a year ago on the subject of the weed status of Jatropha. He said it was unlikely that its status in WA would be reviewed. Apparently it is perceived to be a 'threat' to the pastoral industry. It may have potential as a woody weed, ie once allowed to grow here it may not be possible to confine it to the arid wastes. Also, it may have definite prospects as a source of fuel in places like India where labour is cheap, but I am not so sure about in Australia where labour is anything but cheap. It is possibly a very labour intensive crop, especially for the harvesting, that could put it out of economic viability as a source of oil in Australia. Harvesting could be mechanised, I am sure, but the equipment would have to be developed and may not be cost effective anyway. Nothing is ever as easy as one might like to view it.

                There are a coulpe of other oilseed producing trees that could also be considered; Moringa oleifera and Pongamia pinnata. There has been some initial work done in DAFWA into these, ie a general look see. Then again, olive oil would make an excellent biodiesel and there are lots of olive trees around.

                Regards

                Margaret C.
                Now, Jatropha may be just the "bees knees" for biodiesel in many locations, but canola and mustard are suited to low labour cost, broadacre production, which provide the maximum amount of oil per $.
                Life is a journey, with problems to solve, lessons to learn, but most of all, experiences to enjoy.

                Current Vehicles in stable:
                '06 Musso Sports 4X4 Manual Crew Cab tray back.
                '04 Rexton 4X4 Automatic SUV
                '2014 Toyota Prius (on ULP) - Wife's car

                Previous Vehicles:
                '90 Mazda Capella. (2000 - 2003) My first Fatmobile. Converted to fun on veggie oil with a 2 tank setup.
                '80 Mercedes 300D. 2 tank conversion [Sold]
                '84 Mercedes 300D. 1 tank, no conversion. Replaced engine with rebuilt OM617A turbodiesel engine. Finally had good power. Engine donor for W123 coupe. (body parted out and carcass sold for scrap.)
                '85 Mercedes Benz W123 300CD Turbodiesel
                '99 Mercedes W202 C250 Turbodiesel (my darling Wife's car)[sold]
                '98 Mercedes W202 C250 Turbodiesel (my car)[sold]
                '06 Musso Sports Crew Cab well body. [Head gasket blew!]
                '04 Rexton SUV 2.9L Turbodiesel same as Musso - Our Family car.
                '06 Musso sports Crew Cab Trayback - My hack (no air cond, no heater).

                Searching the Biofuels Forum using Google
                Adding images and/or documents to your posts

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

                  Hi everyone,
                  I need help - Badly!
                  I have tried, and am still trying, but cannot get any "qualified", and/or "guaranteed" right, answers from the Government in many of the states as to whether Jatropha Curcas is allowed to be grown. However, most states simply refer me on to another section or department. Examples:
                  (1) I contacted DPI&F also but have not received any response.
                  (2) I contacted AQIS Plant Programs and they informed me that according to "Australia's Virtual Herbarium" Jatropha curcas is grown/found in Queensland and the Northern Territory. However, they could not say whether it is allowed to be grown as a crop. They have referred me to the Department of Agriculture in those regions.
                  (3) I contacted the NT Government and was informed by the "Horticulture Information Service - Dept Primary Industry, Fisheries and Mines" that according to "Weeds of the Wet/Dry Tropics of Australia - A Field Guide" this species is a declared noxious weed class A, meaning "to be eradicated" and "not to be introduced to the Territory". However, they referred me to:
                  Parks & Wildlife NT.
                  Environment Centre NT.
                  Weeds Branch, Dept of natural Resources, Environment & the Arts.
                  (4) I contacted all the above but no replies from anyone.
                  (5) When I contacted WA they said Jatropha curcas is a "declared plant" in Western Australia - No explanations, just simply a quote from some bible of theirs, and Jatropha curcas probably has not been re investigated since the bible was written some years ago.
                  (6) The story goes on and on - but I still cannot get any "real" answers.
                  (7) Just to exemplify the many problems that many (if not all) states are facing - Below is a small section of a report in the Courier-Mail/Australia,Apr 19, 2006: -
                  Queensland's Biodiesel Dilemma
                  “The future growth and sustainability of the biodiesel industry will depend on access to a diversity of feedstocks,” Premier Peter Beattie's office said. “It is likely that future initiatives will include research into alternative feedstocks such as biodiesel.” One option if there's a tallow squeeze, according to ARF's Butcher, is to import palm oil or coconut oil.
                  The National Party's Rosemary Menkens says biodiesel is an area which “needs to be pursued”. She highlights the rising cost of oil and establishing secure fuel supplies as reasons. The State Government is also backing some trials and is to release a “Biodiesel Action Plan”.
                  Hope to get some help from my friends out there.
                  Regards,
                  Peter

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

                    WHAT A JOKE!!!!!!!!!!!!
                    What the F#*k is a noxious weed anyway. Humans can be quite noxious.
                    A noxious weed is nothing more than a plant nobody can come up with a use for.
                    Is a genetically modified grain "A noxious weed" ??. I would say YES, just as a corporation is a PSYCHOPATH.
                    In the 60's prickly pear was considered a noxious weed, We (the CSIRO) eradicated it with a beetle. Now prickly pear fruit can be bought at the Markets and is quite favoured by southern europeans, because of its high sugar content. but NOW we cant grow it without pesticides because of those pesky beetles, introduced by CSIRO. Being a fruit that grows well in arid desert regions where NOTHING else grows, and considering we could also ferment its flesh, it would be a great provider of outback ETHANOL. In far northern NSW Camphorelaural is a noxious weed , a beautiful hardwood with antibacterial and natural pesticide characteristics, a hardwood naturally termite resistant, that grows faster than pine, has a beautiful aroma, and aesthetic, but because we don't mill it, or use it in furniture manufacturing, or housing construction Its a "Noxious weed". Would any Politician push for a legislation banning radiata pine, i dont think so, but take a walk in a Pine plantation and listen carefully for a bird, an insect, any movement giving away ANYTHING living in the forest. THATS A NOXIOUS WEED!!!!
                    when a plant becomes useful we cant grow enough of it, we monocultivate it in vast regions of the earths surface, and the idea of it getting out of control is preposterous.
                    Bamboo was once considered a noxious weed, in southern QLD, NOW you cant find any old growth clumps, because someone came up with the bright idea of making bamboo laminates and flooring for construction.
                    I think W.A. Politicians are a bunch of "noxious little weeds" who have sh#t for brains and have just shot themselves in the foot.
                    darren leonadas
                    Senior Member
                    Last edited by darren leonadas; 28 June 2006, 04:28 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

                      Originally posted by darren leonadas
                      WHAT A JOKE!!!!!!!!!!!!
                      What the F#*k is a noxious weed anyway. Humans can be quite noxious.
                      A noxious weed is nothing more than a plant nobody can come up with a use for.
                      Is a genetically modified grain "A noxious weed" . I would say YES, just as a corporation is a PSYCHOPATH.
                      In the 60's prickly pear was considered a noxious weed, We (the CSIRO) eradicated it with a beetle. Now prickly pear fruit can be bought at the Markets and is quite favoured by southern europeans, because of its high sugar content. but NOW we cant grow it without pesticides because of those pesky beetles, introduced by CSIRO. Being a fruit that grows well in arid desert regions where NOTHING else grows, and considering we could also ferment its flesh, it would be a great provider of outback ETHANOL. In far northern NSW camphorelaural is a noxious weed , a beautiful hardwood with antibacterial and natural pesticide characteristics, a hardwood naturally termite resistant, that grows faster than pine, but because we don't mill it, or use it in furniture manufacturing, or housing construction Its a "Noxious weed". Would any Politician push for a legislation banning radiata pine, i dont think so, but take a walk in a Pine plantation and listen carefully for a bird, an insect, any movement giving away ANYTHING living in the forest. THATS A NOXIOUS WEED!!!!
                      when a plant becomes useful we cant grow enough of it, we monocultivate it in vast regions of the earths surface, and the idea of it getting out of control is preposterous.
                      Bamboo was once considered a noxious weed, in southern QLD, NOW you cant find any old growth clumps, because someone came up with the bright idea of making bamboo laminates and flooring for construction.
                      I think W.A. Politicians are a bunch of "noxious little weeds" who have sh#t for brains and have just shot themselves in the foot.
                      Darren,

                      Does the Polis in WA know what they have done.The funniest thing that the polis hAve put forward as the main reason for declaring the oil tree as a NOXIOUS WEED is that it is harmful to cattle.Do they know about the medicinal values of Jatropha.
                      I am toying with the idea of putting together a Scientific Dissertation and presenting it to the WA govt..I can get that done in a week.LIKE REAL HARD FACTS BACKED WITH YEARS OF RESEARCH DATA FROM WORLDWIDE WORK DONE FOR ABOUT 2 DECADES ON THE PLANT.I am a Oil Technologist by proffession, I have spent about 10 hours of my life for the last 18 years on the subject.Don't know wether they will take it chin up.
                      But I need some one in Aus to take initiative and put it across the polis(I am in Sweaty beautiful India at the moment).Don't know what that will achieve .But hey I think we can do our own little bit .

                      Cheers
                      Sauman

                      Darren>>>You so right about the Pine tress and the prickly pear.Thanks for sharing .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

                        Hmm if you don't know what "noxious weed" means, I sure as hell hope you're not spouting environmental rhetoric when advocating biodiesel. Yes, "weed" means no use is known or the uses aren't economical, or the problems outweigh the benefits. But "noxious" means it poses a serious threat to the environment, livestock or humans. To try to ignore this just because you stand to lose as a result of pretty crook if you ask me. I suppose you'd be in to growing mimosa or lantana too if you thought you could make a buck?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

                          Russell, If you threw a wad of cash on the ground under a sign saying "no littering" , do you think someone would charge you with the offense of littering, or do you think someone would pick it up for you.? or for themselves?
                          This recent ban on jatropha, and the even more recent advent of suddenly putting excise of 38c in the litre on Meth. is a conspiracy. Call me a freak, but the oil corporation is a psychopath. And state gov. and fed. gov. make a lot of money out of the work of this psychopath.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation

                            Hi all
                            The jatropha topic has been interesting reading I have not seen anything posted here as an alternative in so far as trees/bushes are concerned
                            So here is a bit of info to the Chinese Tallow tree that may be of interest
                            At least that is an alternative I would have thought for some areas, it is not a declared plant in any state to the best of my knowledge and it is planted here as a street tree
                            There is a lot of iformation available on that tree, this short article gives one a very good over view Unfortunately this tree is not very drought tolerant
                            Cheers
                            Chris
                            Here it is
                            Production of Biodiesel from Lipids Extracted from Chinese Tallow Tree., S. Crymble1, B. Copeland1, M. Zappi1, R. Hernandes1, T. French1, B. Baldwin1, D. Thomas2, 1Mississippi State University, USA, 2Mississippi Chemical, USA.

                            Sapium sebiferum, commonly known as the Chinese Tallow tree, was introduced into the United States from its native China as early as the 1700s. Unfortunately, the tree’s nonnative characteristics allow it to overrun and easily displace native foliage. Despite its attractive appearance and valuable oil content, many regions have placed restrictions on the distribution of the tree, as it has invaded areas throughout the southeastern United States.Chinese Tallow grows quickly in a variety of soils. The fruit of the tree is a white seed that contains approximately 40% extractable lipids. This extract can be used to produce a number of products, including biodiesel. One hectare of Chinese Tallow trees can produce approximately 12,500 kg of seed, which could potentially yield 5,500 kg of oil. This amount of oil per hectare is almost 15 times that of soy oil, which is the most commonly oil for making biodiesel.The oil that is produced from the Chinese Tallow tree has been found to contain high amounts of palmitic fatty acid, along with some oleic, linoleic and linolinic fatty acids. These acids can be base transesterified to form biodiesel. Making biodiesel from Chinese Tallow oil would accomplish two major goals. The invasive Chinese Tallow tree would become a useful, commercially viable crop. Also, the biodiesel produced from Chinese Tallow would allow the United States to decrease its dependence on imported energy by displacing foreign petroleum with a domestic source of biodiesel that would not increase the necessary crop acreage.
                            Cheers
                            Chris
                            Never give up :)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: WA government bans jatropha cultivation - Re. Chinese Tallow

                              I agree that the Chinese Tallow looks to be a promising candidate for biodiesel feedstock. The following extract (now quite dated going by the references) gives pertinent details as to its potential.
                              Sapium sebiferum

                              Note that in the para pertaining to Yield MT refers to Metric Tonnes (ie, kilograms). The $ returns would also probably be much higher now.

                              Comment

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