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Thread: Using the tote?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
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    Valdosta,ga
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    1

    Using the tote?

    What are your thoughts on using a 250 gallon caged tote as the actual processor? Think the heat would be a problem? Should be able to withstand the actual biodoesel chemicals.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    4,269

    Re: Using the tote?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pavetim View Post
    What are your thoughts on using a 250 gallon caged tote as the actual processor? Think the heat would be a problem? Should be able to withstand the actual biodiesel chemicals.
    The biodiesel reaction will proceed (albeit slowly) at 20C, so the temperature should not be an issue.
    I found this table
    Material
    Minimum operating temp. for
    short periods
    Minimum operating temperature continuous
    Maximum operating temp. for
    short periods
    Maximum operating temperature continuous
    PTFE (Virgin)
    -280
    -250
    290
    260
    High Perform. Mats
    -60 to -20
    -30 to -10
    160 to 310
    150 to 250
    Polypropylene
    -15
    -10
    145
    130
    Polycarbonate
    -60
    -30
    135
    121
    PETP
    -30
    -20
    160
    110
    Acetal (C)
    -50
    -40
    140
    110
    Nylon 66SA
    -40
    -30
    180
    95
    Bakelite
    -120
    -100
    105
    90
    UHMWPE
    -280
    -260
    110
    90
    Polyurethane
    -60
    -45
    100
    85
    HMWPE
    -120
    -100
    100
    80
    HDPE
    -65
    -50
    100
    80
    Acrylic
    -200
    -150
    70
    60
    PVC
    -15
    0
    80
    50

    on http://www.stug.com.au/materials/eng...mperatures.php

    You should be able to operate the HDPE at up to 80C, way more than the desired biodiesel reaction temperature, so Yes, a 250gal (1000L) IBC would work.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    306

    Re: Using the tote?

    I made biodiesel from new corn oil , potassium hydroxide , calcium oxide and methanol in a 1 liter glass bottle at room temperature. It's not all that slow. A problem was keeping the methoxide mixed with the vegetable oil. I had a teflon cap on the bottle so there was no dissolving of plastic. The best room temperature way to make biodiesel I believe is with super dry alcohol that sodium is added to. There is a problem adding calcium oxide and potassium hydroxide to the methoxide , if calcium soaps are produced.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    ลึก ประเทศอินเด&
    Posts
    2,104

    Re: Using the tote?

    Hi Pavetim,
    Welcome to the forum.

    Another concern I have is that considering there are corners in a tote, is to insure thorough mixing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    306

    Re: Using the tote?

    I didn't express what I meant to write simply. It's likely that with elevated temperature the plastic in a tote would be more vulnerable to chemical attack. I made methyl salicylate once, putting about 25 milliliters of it in a plastic bottle. The liquid oil of spearmint (methyl salicylate) dissolved its' way out of the bottle leaving a little puddle on the shelf. At lower temperatures the tote plastic might do better. So, a sigle step base reaction (transesterification reaction) at room temperature will work if enough mixing is done during the reaction. There's a generalization for reaction rate that's probably accurate for making biodiesel, for every 10 degrees celcius increase in temperature the reaction rate may be about twice as fast. So if the reaction took one hour at 60 degrees at 50 degrees an equivalent reaction takes 2 hours , at 40 degrees it takes 4 hours, at 30 degrees it takes 8 hours , at my room temperature of 25 degrees celcius it takes abour 12 hours. If you're heating your chemicals in plastic there might be a problem, but with enough stirring in warm weather heating is not necessary with the common potassium hydroxide in dry methanol, and dry vegetable oil.

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